Parafictional objects: Her Finger by Chun Shao

Her Finger is a series of kinetic finger accessories. It presents a hybrid form of wearable objects, which mingles the functionality and sensuality between an ancient Chinese fingernail guard and a modern female stimulator. The two types of finger related objects create this interesting tension between power and pleasure, external and internal, rigid and soft.

Fractal Antennae - an ongoing research project by Afroditi Psarra

The miniaturization of electronic devices has led to the development of what is known as fractal antennas - miniaturized antennas that use an iterative function system to create a fractal element at a reduced size. The term "fractal" was first used by mathematician Benoit Mandelbrot in 1975. Mandelbrot based it on the Latin frāctus meaning "broken" or "fractured", and used it to extend the concept of theoretical fractional dimensions to geometric patterns in nature. One of the properties of fractals geometry is that it can have an infinite length while fitting in a finite volume. The radiation characteristic of any electromagnetic radiator depends on electrical length of the structure. By using the property of fractal geometry in antenna design one can increase the electrical length, keeping the volume of the antenna the same.

Kate Sicchio on Movement and Wearables

On Tuesday, October 31st 2017 we had the opportunity to host media artist and scholar, Kate Sicchio from NYU on a series of talks and workshops on Movement and Wearables, as well as the concept of Choreotopology. Kate works at the interface of technology and performance. By opening a dialogue between how people move and how this may change by engaging with the digital, she aims to create choreography, performative scores, video, programming languages and hacking methodologies.

DXARTS 490B: E-textiles & Wearables for Art & Design - Spring 2017

DXARTS 490B is an introductory course to electronic textiles, soft-circuits and wearable technology. It provides hands-on prototyping for physical computing projects that explore the body as an interface of control for interactive environments. The students engage with smart materials, hand-crafted electronics and creative programming with Arduino to design their own interactive wearables. E-textiles and wearable computing can be used in multimedia performance projects, interface or game design, medical monitoring systems, and also as educational tools for people of all ages.

Irene Posch on E-textile tools at HCDE

On April 2017 Daniela Rosner and the Tactile & Tactical Design (TAT) Lab of HCDE hosted Austrian e-textile designer Irene Posch as an Artist-In-Residency. During her time at the University of Washington Irene Posch presented her work and her collaboration with e-textile designer Ebru Kurbak through the e-textiles research group Stitching Worlds at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna. Irene and Daniela invited the DXARTS 490B: E-textiles & Wearables students to her talk and a hands-on workshop on making e-textile tools.