All tagged wearable technology

Chameleon Color Changing Wearable by Taylor Hammes

RBG sensor, electromyographic sensor, motor, and leds embed within my future skin for activation and protection. Entering upon a new spaces, the RBG sensor reads the aura of the room and sends that information through my new veins and communicated through lights. Sound is trigged from the electromyorphic information that my right arm indicates while taking in the colors. 

Wearable Synthesizer: Modifying open source code with the use of E-textiles by William Perry

This wearable synth was inspired by the complexity of human emotions in conjunction with the comfort of human touch. Housed in a weighted sweater, the user experiences a subtle pressure on their shoulders, while the instrument is being played. Mimicking the feeling of being hugged, the user can squeeze the arms of the sweater, actuating the pressure sensors, intern synthesizing tones.

Interactive Origami Migraine Aura by Kellie Dunn

An interactive representation of a migraine aura. There's a soft pressure sensor built into one side of the cap, so that when you touch that side of the head, the lights blink faster and the origami tessellations move. I tried to capture the surreal psychedelic quality of a typical "fortification spectrum" visual aura.

Kate Sicchio on Movement and Wearables

On Tuesday, October 31st 2017 we had the opportunity to host media artist and scholar, Kate Sicchio from NYU on a series of talks and workshops on Movement and Wearables, as well as the concept of Choreotopology. Kate works at the interface of technology and performance. By opening a dialogue between how people move and how this may change by engaging with the digital, she aims to create choreography, performative scores, video, programming languages and hacking methodologies.

DXARTS 490B: E-textiles & Wearables for Art & Design - Spring 2017

DXARTS 490B is an introductory course to electronic textiles, soft-circuits and wearable technology. It provides hands-on prototyping for physical computing projects that explore the body as an interface of control for interactive environments. The students engage with smart materials, hand-crafted electronics and creative programming with Arduino to design their own interactive wearables. E-textiles and wearable computing can be used in multimedia performance projects, interface or game design, medical monitoring systems, and also as educational tools for people of all ages.